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Orange Crate Art

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  1. Orange Crate Art Brian Wilson & Van Dyke Parks
    Want us to release this album? Then vote now!
    Place your vote by entering your email address below. If this title receives enough votes, we will press it and let you know when it becomes availble to order.
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    Orange Crate Art
    Album Details
    • If voted to win, this would be the first time this album would be available on vinyl 
    • Would be pressed on 2-180g color vinyl records at Record Industry and come in a gatefold tip-on style jacket with insert
    • Would be limited and individually numbered based on pre-orders

     

    Biography

    Orange Crate Art is the first studio collaboration by Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, 30 years after the ill-fated “Smile” collaboration and was originally released in 1995 on Warner Bros. Records. The album consists of songs written and arranged by Parks, with Wilson featured as lead and backing vocalist. Orange Crate Art refers to the sun-drenched, idealized paintings of California that grace wooden fruit crates and its theme is a nostalgic view of the state. In 1992 Parks approached a then-reclusive Wilson with an invitation to record another album together. Wilson at the time was in the middle of a court-ordered removal and restraining order from his psychiatrist, which came as a result of years of over-medication and gross misconduct. According to Parks, “The reason why I asked him was to take care of this unfinished business, and try to escape from the tyranny of the sense of history that’s been placed on our own aborted effort (Smile).” He later added, “When I found him, he was alone in a room staring at a television. It was off.” It is reported that Wilson interrupted the first vocal session by asking Parks, “Wait a minute. What Am I Even Doing Here?” Parks hit the talk back button and replied, “You’re here because I can’t stand the sound of my own voice!” Wilson paused, nodded his head, and stepped up to the microphone proclaiming, “Well that makes sense! Okay take one!” Though billed and anticipated as a full collaboration, the album is devoted to Parks’ compositions, and features his typical dense wordplay and orchestrations. Wilson contributed only the vocals and vocal arrangements. Parks also reported that despite his invitation, Wilson had declined to contribute any music to the project. Despite this, he was impassioned to record the album for Parks, determined to make something that he “could live with” ten years from then. Given the history of the artists, the album came with high expectations, but upon its release it received mixed critical reviews and had lackluster sales, even failing to chart. Parks has repeatedly stated his disappointment with the album’s reception, saying “It took three years and $350,000. The record came out and sank without a trace.”

    Track Listing
    Track Sides: 
    Side A
    List of tracks: 
    Track Title: 
    1 Orange Crate Art
    Track Duration: 
    3:00
    Track Title: 
    2 Sail Away
    Track Duration: 
    5:14
    Track Title: 
    3 My Hobo Heart
    Track Duration: 
    3:15
    Track Title: 
    4 Wings Of A Dove
    Track Duration: 
    3:06
    Track Sides: 
    Side B
    List of tracks: 
    Track Title: 
    1 Palm Tree And Moon
    Track Duration: 
    4:06
    Track Title: 
    2 Summer in Monterey
    Track Duration: 
    4:13
    Track Title: 
    3 San Francisco
    Track Duration: 
    4:27
    Track Sides: 
    Side C
    List of tracks: 
    Track Title: 
    1 Hold Back Time
    Track Duration: 
    3:39
    Track Title: 
    2 My Jeanine
    Track Duration: 
    3:13
    Track Title: 
    3 Movies Is Magic
    Track Duration: 
    3:54
    Track Sides: 
    Side D
    List of tracks: 
    Track Title: 
    1 This Town Goes Down At Sunset
    Track Duration: 
    3:21
    Track Title: 
    2 Lullaby
    Track Duration: 
    6:05
Release date: 
July 10, 2019
Audio Player Embed: 

Artist Name: 
Brian Wilson & Van Dyke Parks
Album Detail: 
  • If voted to win, this would be the first time this album would be available on vinyl 
  • Would be pressed on 2-180g color vinyl records at Record Industry and come in a gatefold tip-on style jacket with insert
  • Would be limited and individually numbered based on pre-orders

 

Biography

Orange Crate Art is the first studio collaboration by Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, 30 years after the ill-fated “Smile” collaboration and was originally released in 1995 on Warner Bros. Records. The album consists of songs written and arranged by Parks, with Wilson featured as lead and backing vocalist. Orange Crate Art refers to the sun-drenched, idealized paintings of California that grace wooden fruit crates and its theme is a nostalgic view of the state. In 1992 Parks approached a then-reclusive Wilson with an invitation to record another album together. Wilson at the time was in the middle of a court-ordered removal and restraining order from his psychiatrist, which came as a result of years of over-medication and gross misconduct. According to Parks, “The reason why I asked him was to take care of this unfinished business, and try to escape from the tyranny of the sense of history that’s been placed on our own aborted effort (Smile).” He later added, “When I found him, he was alone in a room staring at a television. It was off.” It is reported that Wilson interrupted the first vocal session by asking Parks, “Wait a minute. What Am I Even Doing Here?” Parks hit the talk back button and replied, “You’re here because I can’t stand the sound of my own voice!” Wilson paused, nodded his head, and stepped up to the microphone proclaiming, “Well that makes sense! Okay take one!” Though billed and anticipated as a full collaboration, the album is devoted to Parks’ compositions, and features his typical dense wordplay and orchestrations. Wilson contributed only the vocals and vocal arrangements. Parks also reported that despite his invitation, Wilson had declined to contribute any music to the project. Despite this, he was impassioned to record the album for Parks, determined to make something that he “could live with” ten years from then. Given the history of the artists, the album came with high expectations, but upon its release it received mixed critical reviews and had lackluster sales, even failing to chart. Parks has repeatedly stated his disappointment with the album’s reception, saying “It took three years and $350,000. The record came out and sank without a trace.”

Is Voting For the Next Release?: 
yes
Is record of the month: 
No
Pre Order End Date: 
Thursday, August 8, 2019 - 11:00
Track Listings: 
Track Sides: 
Side A
List of tracks: 
Track Title: 
1 Orange Crate Art
Track Duration: 
3:00
Track Title: 
2 Sail Away
Track Duration: 
5:14
Track Title: 
3 My Hobo Heart
Track Duration: 
3:15
Track Title: 
4 Wings Of A Dove
Track Duration: 
3:06
Track Sides: 
Side B
List of tracks: 
Track Title: 
1 Palm Tree And Moon
Track Duration: 
4:06
Track Title: 
2 Summer in Monterey
Track Duration: 
4:13
Track Title: 
3 San Francisco
Track Duration: 
4:27
Track Sides: 
Side C
List of tracks: 
Track Title: 
1 Hold Back Time
Track Duration: 
3:39
Track Title: 
2 My Jeanine
Track Duration: 
3:13
Track Title: 
3 Movies Is Magic
Track Duration: 
3:54
Track Sides: 
Side D
List of tracks: 
Track Title: 
1 This Town Goes Down At Sunset
Track Duration: 
3:21
Track Title: 
2 Lullaby
Track Duration: 
6:05
List of tracks: 
Is out of stock: 
No

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  • Orange Crate Art
    Brian Wilson & Van Dyke Parks
    QUICK VIEW

    Orange Crate Art Brian Wilson & Van Dyke Parks
    Want us to release this album? Then vote now!
    Place your vote by entering your email address below. If this title receives enough votes, we will press it and let you know when it becomes availble to order.
    Thanks for voting
    Orange Crate Art
    Album Details
    • If voted to win, this would be the first time this album would be available on vinyl 
    • Would be pressed on 2-180g color vinyl records at Record Industry and come in a gatefold tip-on style jacket with insert
    • Would be limited and individually numbered based on pre-orders

     

    Biography

    Orange Crate Art is the first studio collaboration by Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks, 30 years after the ill-fated “Smile” collaboration and was originally released in 1995 on Warner Bros. Records. The album consists of songs written and arranged by Parks, with Wilson featured as lead and backing vocalist. Orange Crate Art refers to the sun-drenched, idealized paintings of California that grace wooden fruit crates and its theme is a nostalgic view of the state. In 1992 Parks approached a then-reclusive Wilson with an invitation to record another album together. Wilson at the time was in the middle of a court-ordered removal and restraining order from his psychiatrist, which came as a result of years of over-medication and gross misconduct. According to Parks, “The reason why I asked him was to take care of this unfinished business, and try to escape from the tyranny of the sense of history that’s been placed on our own aborted effort (Smile).” He later added, “When I found him, he was alone in a room staring at a television. It was off.” It is reported that Wilson interrupted the first vocal session by asking Parks, “Wait a minute. What Am I Even Doing Here?” Parks hit the talk back button and replied, “You’re here because I can’t stand the sound of my own voice!” Wilson paused, nodded his head, and stepped up to the microphone proclaiming, “Well that makes sense! Okay take one!” Though billed and anticipated as a full collaboration, the album is devoted to Parks’ compositions, and features his typical dense wordplay and orchestrations. Wilson contributed only the vocals and vocal arrangements. Parks also reported that despite his invitation, Wilson had declined to contribute any music to the project. Despite this, he was impassioned to record the album for Parks, determined to make something that he “could live with” ten years from then. Given the history of the artists, the album came with high expectations, but upon its release it received mixed critical reviews and had lackluster sales, even failing to chart. Parks has repeatedly stated his disappointment with the album’s reception, saying “It took three years and $350,000. The record came out and sank without a trace.”

  • With These Hands
    Alejandro Escovedo
    QUICK VIEW
    With These Hands Alejandro Escovedo
    Want us to release this album? Then vote now!
    Place your vote by entering your email address below. If this title receives enough votes, we will press it and let you know when it becomes availble to order.
    Thanks for voting
    With These Hands
    Album Details
    • If voted to win, this would be the first time Alejandro’s Rykodisc debut would be available on vinyl
    • Would be pressed on 2-180g vinyl records at Record Industry and come in a gatefold tip-on style jacket with insert
    • Would be limited and individually numbered based on pre-orders

    Biography

    Alejandro is a Mexican-American rock musician, songwriter and singer that has been recording and touring since the late 1970s. The son of Mexican immigrants to Texas, Escovedo is from a musical family that includes several professionals, including his brothers Coke Escovedo and Pete Escovedo, and Sheila E. (Pete’s daughter and Alejandro’s niece). Alejandro’s brother Mario fronted the hard rock band the Dragons, and another brother, Javier, was in the punk rock band, the Zeros. He began performing in the first-wave punk rock group the Nuns, with Jennifer Miro and Jeff Olener in San Francisco. In the 1980s Escovedo moved to Austin, where he adopted a roots rock/alternative country style in the bands Rank and File and the True Believers (with his brother Javier). His first solo albums, Gravity and Thirteen Years, were released in 1992 and 1994. In 1997, Alejandro collaborated with Ryan Adams and Whiskeytown in sessions for their album Strangers Almanac. He sings on “Excuse Me While I Break My Own Heart Tonight,” “Dancing with The Women at the Bar”, and “Not Home Anymore.” In 1995 he signed with Rykodisc and released his solo album, “With These Hands.” With a bit more money at his disposal, the production on this record displays greater depth and polish and he was able to bring along a few celebrity side guests – Willie Nelson, Jennifer Warnes, and his cousin Sheila E. – who add to the music without calling undue attention to themselves. In 1998 No Depression magazine named him Artist of the Decade. In 1999 he contributed to a tribute album for Skip Spence, co-founder of Moby Grape, who was critically ill with cancer. “More Oar: A Tribute to the Skip Spence Album” was intended to raise funds to address Spence’s medical bills. Critic Rob Brunner commented, “Alejandro Escovedo offers an appropriately bleary “Diana,” Spence’s darkest song.” In 2003 after having lived with hepatitis C for many years, Alejandro collapsed on stage in Arizona. In his long road to recovery he faced substantial medical bills, which lacking medical insurance, he could not pay. Friends and admirers organized benefit shows to help. This effort grew into the album Por Vida: A Tribute to the Songs of Alejandro Escovedo, whose proceeds benefited the Alejandro Escovedo Medical and Living Expense Fund. Contributing musicians included Steve Earle, Lucinda Williams, John Cale, Jennifer Warnes, Ian Hunter, The Jayhawks, Son Volt and various members of Escovedo’s family. Escovedo continues to release solo albums on various labels including Bloodshot, Blue Rose, Fantasy and Yep Roc. In 2014 he appeared in the movie and contributed to the soundtrack of the movie Veronica Mars, singing an acoustic version of “We Used to Be Friends.” That same year he co-produced and co-hosted the SXSW Tribute to Lou Reed with Richard Barone. If voted to win, ROG will issue Alejandro’s Rykodisc debut, “With These Hands” on vinyl for the very first time!

  • A Hundred Miles Off
    The Walkmen
    QUICK VIEW

    A Hundred Miles Off The Walkmen
    Want us to release this album? Then vote now!
    Place your vote by entering your email address below. If this title receives enough votes, we will press it and let you know when it becomes availble to order.
    Thanks for voting
    A Hundred Miles Off
    Album Details
    • If voted to win, this would the first reissue on vinyl since 2006.
    • Original pressings on vinyl are out of print and expensive.
    • Would be pressed on 180g multi-colored color vinyl at Record Industry and come in a single pocket tip-on jacket.
    • Would be limited and individually numbered based on pre-orders

     

    Biography

    The Walkmen are an American indie rock band, formed in 2000 with three members from Jonathan Fire*Eater-Paul Maroon (guitar, piano), Walter Martin (organ/bass) and Matt Barrick (drums) – and two from The Recoys Peter Bauer (bass/organ) and Hamilton Leithauser (vocals, guitar). Each of the members grew up in and around Washington D.C. and played in many of the same bands from early in their careers. After the break-ups of Jonathan Fire*Eater and The Recoys in 2000, The Walkmen formed and created a rehearsal space in New York, called Marcata Studios. The newly formed band wanted to move away from the garage rock sounds of previous bands and released a self-titled EP on Startime International in 2001 that featured a blend of upright pianos and other vintage instruments. Their 2002 debut album on Startime, “Everyone Who Pretends To Like Me Is Gone” was well received by critics upon release. The album was noted for its innovative use of atmospheric instrumentation, with sparse bass and drums complimented by plinking piano, jangly guitars and Leithauser’s unique vocals. Two of the songs on the album – “The Blizzard Of ‘96” and “That’s The Punchline” were adaptations of tracks meant for the Recoys’ unreleased full-length album. The band’s follow up, “Bows + Arrows” was released on the Record Collection label in 2004 and was listed by many critics as one of the year’s best albums. The album was recorded in 2003 at Marcata Recording in New York City, Sweet Tea Studios in Oxford, MS, Easley-McCann Studios in Memphis, TN, and The Magic Shop in New York City. The album spawned singles for the songs, “The Rat” and “Little House of Savages.” Critical success led the band to perform on the Fox series The O.C. “Bows + Arrows” was noted for having a more immediate and focused sound than its predecessor, with “The Rat” and “Little House of Savages” seen as stark contrasts to much of the band’s previous output and peaked at #8 on the US Heatseekers chart. Their next album, “A Hundred Miles Off,” was released in the U.S. on May 23, 2006. The band premiered most of the songs on a tour of the Northeast earlier that year. The first single to be released was “Louisiana,” which featured an upbeat chorus of horns and peaked at #160 in the UK. Peter Bauer and Walter Martin traded musical instruments on the album, with Bauer handling the organ duties and Martin playing bass. The album featured the band refocusing its sound toward folk, unlike their previous two albums; though the change in direction was lauded by some critics, other reviews were mixed. The album peaked at #3 on the US Heatseekers chart and #163 overall. That same year, the band was forced to close Marcata Studios after Columbia University purchased the building. The band went on to release 3 more full length albums – one on Gigantic Music and two on Fat Possum Records. Many of their songs have been featured in film, such as “Red River” on the Spider-Man 3 Soundtrack, Red Moon” in season 2, episode 2 of Breaking Bad, and “Heaven” in the series finale of How I Met Your Mother. The band are currently on hiatus, with Leithauser, Bauer and Martin pursuing solo careers and Barrick joining Fleet Foxes in a touring and session capacity.