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  1. THIS MONTH’S WINNING TITLE
    Belly Bees
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    Give Out But Don’t Give Up (The Original Memphis Recordings)
    Primal Scream
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    Give Out But Don’t Give Up (The Original Memphis Recordings) Primal Scream
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    Give Out But Don’t Give Up (The Original Memphis Recordings)
    Album Details
    • If voted to win, this would be the first US release on vinyl
    • Would feature 2 additional LPs of bonus tracks making their debut on vinyl      
    • Would be cut at 33 1/3 rpm for the first time by original mastering engineer Jeff Powell, pressed on 2-140g records and would come in deluxe packaging with a booklet.
    • Would be limited and individually numbered

    Biography

    Over the past three and a half decades, Primal Scream have embraced everything from psychedelic pop to degenerate rock’n’roll; euphoric rave to industrial gloom. They have made records with George Clinton and Kate Moss, invited Mani of the Stone Roses and Kevin Shields of My Bloody Valentine into the fold, survived narcotic oblivion, personal trauma and the death of beloved guitarist Robert “Throb” Young, and captured the mood of the nation several times over. Throughout it all, they have always sounded like Primal Scream. And they have always made great singles. 

     

    “Right from our 1985 debut All Fall Down onward we’ve approached singles as an aesthetic choice, a statement of where we are as a band,” says Bobby Gillespie. “We grew up with Suffragette City and Metal Guru flying out of the radio. The four Sex Pistols singles were great. Public Image by PiL sounded like nothing else. Prince and Madonna made amazing hits. That has been our approach. I’ve always loved Top 40 pop radio, I love greatest hits albums like The Who’s Meaty, Beaty, Big & Bouncy. I remember Alan McGee saying of Higher Than The Sun: it won’t be a hit, but it will be a statement. Great singles can get out into the world and show people an alternative way of thinking. They make you feel less alone.”

     

    Primal Scream began in early 80s Glasgow after Gillespie bonded with childhood friend Jim Beattie over a love of 60s garage, 70s punk and other cool moments from the history of 20th century music. Smart, working class kids for whom school was a reality to be endured, they realised early on the possibilities of music as a portal of discovery. 

     

    “In 70s Glasgow, school was set up to turn you into fodder for industry,” says Gillespie. “I left school at 15 because my dad got me a job in a factory, and I soon found the experience horrifying and traumatising. I was hungry to learn, but I had never been encouraged by my teachers and my parents were always working. My education came from rock’n’roll, punk rock, and the music press.”

     

    Early Primal Scream singles, the wonderfully brief Velocity Girl in particular, were nuggets of innocent psychedelic pop with a strong influence from the Byrds and Love albums Gillespie and Beattie were digging into at the time. “In the early days I wanted to sound like the bands I loved, but then reality hit. Jim Beattie and Robert Young [initially on bass] were great guitarists, but the drummer and rhythm guitarist were terrible.” There was also a tambourine player. “He didn’t play on any of the records for a simple reason. He was always out of time.”

     

    Those early singles were informed by the sound of Jim Beattie’s 12-string acoustic, which lends itself to 60s folk-rock, but when Beattie left Robert Young moved from bass to guitar, Andrew Innes became the (much better) rhythm guitarist, and Gillespie gave up his ‘day job’ of drumming for fellow Scottish malcontents the Jesus And Mary Chain to concentrate on Primal Scream full-time. That’s when the band found their rock’n’roll spirit. You can hear it on Ivy, Ivy, Ivy, from the band’s self titled second album. 

     

    “Robert loved Johnny Thunders, Link Ray, Neil Young & Crazy Horse… all the rock’n’roll guitarists,” says Gillespie. “Andrew’s been into rock’n’roll since I first met him in the 70s. So the sound changed. But Primal Scream have always been a been a product of necessity, of using what we had and what we could do at the time. We’ve been making it up as we go along; we still are. We’re always trying to craft classic songs, but in the early days the lack of ability often outweighed the yearning to express that feeling.”

     

    With keyboardist / pianist Martin Duffy joining the band full time in 1990,  Everything came together on 1991’s Screamadelica. A perfect amalgam of dance music, rock’n’roll and psychedelic expansion, it captured the hedonism, hopefulness and sheer druggy abandon of young Britain at the time. The sight of Bobby Gillespie standing behind a microphone on Top of the Pops for Loaded, offering only a single vocal line on what was otherwise a samples-based groove, was revolutionary. Then there was Higher Than The Sun, an acid trip in musical form. Come Together and Movin’ On Up were gospel-enriched rock’n’roll soul and Don’t Fight It, Feel It was Northern soul via acid house. The album provided a soundtrack for a generation whose idea of nirvana was dancing in a field at three in the morning before losing their friends, their car keys, and their minds. 

     

    “By the time of Screamadelica we had me, three strong musicians, and the producers Andrew Weatherall and Hugo Nicholson being the rhythm section,” says Gillespie. “The first two albums were limited to guitar, bass and drums. Then acid house happened, we heard the way Paul Oakenfold turned the Happy Mondays’ Wrote For Luck into this incredible groove, and we thought: maybe we could try that. It was all an experiment and it was anti-rock’n’roll in its way. We realised that, through sampling, you could have The Meters’ or James Brown’s drummer. The first two albums were written on guitars. Screamadelica was written on keyboards. It was no longer about macho guitar riffs. It became more feminine.”

     

    Give Out But Don’t Give Up, featuring the Stonesy Rocks, the ramalama-rocking Jailbird and the full-on tearjerker Cry Myself Blind, headed back toward guitars, while also marking one of the strangest episodes in an already strange career. The band recorded an entire version of the album with a team of crack session musicians in Ardent studios, Memphis. The result was a country soul classic, but as Gillespie says: “The band were in a mess. Screamadelica left us in a weird place. Everything we dreamed of since the age of sixteen had come true. Where do you go after that? We were still living the rock’n’roll dream, and we knew what we were doing in making Give Out a guitars-led rock, country and soul album, but we had to move on.” 

     

    In the event a very different version of the album came out, and with the forces of success, drugs, exhaustion and disappointment taking their toll, the band came close to splitting up. Instead they did another about-face.

     

    “By Vanishing Point in 1996 we were working with atmospheres and drums loops. We had just made a rock record, and now we wanted to do the opposite. There were bossa nova beats, dub, instrumental music, cut-ups… Kowalski is not really a song, more a mood. We built a little studio behind Creation Records in Primrose Hill and wrote and recorded the album there and whenever anyone had a musical idea I came up with the lyrics on the spot, no agonising. It is an underground album because we went underground as people. We were retreating from the world. I went deep inside myself and the music reflects that.”

     

    It was another difficult period for the band, though a creatively fertile one. With hardly any guitars on the album Robert Young contributed little to Vanishing Point, leading to a new approach: no more big choruses or standard format song structures, with Gillespie using his voice as a rhythmic instrument rather than as a vehicle for melody. An initial series of gigs were a disaster. “People were coming to hear Rocks and Screamadelica and they were getting this weird music they had never heard before. The producer Adrian Sherwood was doing the sound, and you couldn’t hear a word I was singing. But it was all very experimental and it led to XTRMNTR. We were deconstructing the band, basically.”

     

    Now we get to Swastika Eyes and Kill All Hippies; aggressive industrial barrages with an anti-capitalist agenda, but also reflections on what the drugs culture was doing to people. “When we started, all our friends were musicians, writers and filmmakers — people with a vision. They began to neutralise themselves with hard drugs, as did we, and I realised that hard drugs not only kill your creativity; they are the ultimate form of state control. In the late 60s, black neighbourhoods and hippie communities in American cities were swamped with heroin. There is a line in Swastika Eyes: ‘I see your autosuggestion psychology, elimination policy.’ It is an anti-military song but it is also looking at how, by the end of the 90s, all these formerly creative people were strung out. It wasn’t looking like freedom at all.”

     

    These are heavy songs. 

     

    “They were heavy times.”

     

    The last album Young played guitar on was Riot City Blues in 2006. “Andrew and Robert had a classic twin guitar sound,” says Gillespie. “They didn’t need to speak about it: Robert had the bluesy, sexy riffs while Andrew is more angular and it just worked. And then that was gone when Robert left the band, so you change.” Robert Young died in 2014. He was 49.

     

    There has always been influence from visiting musicians. Mani from the Stone Roses joined Primal Scream in the late 90s and early 2000s, playing bass on Kowalski and most of XTRMNTR. Kevin Shields of My Bloody Valentine mixed tracks and made guest appearances, while reggae legend Augustus Pablo played melodica on Star. 

     

    “I’ve always seen it a bit like George Clinton’s approach with Parliament and Funkadelic: whoever is around and is good should come in, while the core of the band remains the same. Whoever comes into Parliament, it always sounds like Parliament. I hope it always sounds like us — even if we’re making a purely electronic track with nobody actually playing on it. We felt that having a band where everyone has to play on every track was too limiting.”

     

    Even Kate Moss dropped in on 2008’s Evil Heat, for a sultry duet with Gillespie on a cover of Lee Hazlewood and Nancy Sinatra’s Some Velvet Morning. It harked back to the days when Serge Gainsbourg would write a song for Brigitte Bardot, not because she had a wonderful voice (she didn’t) but because she was Brigitte Bardot. 

     

    “That was the idea,” says Gillespie. “Kate is the Brigitte Bardot of our age, she’s our mate, and we were short of a song on Evil Heat so we decided to do a cover. And when you’ve done a hard album like XTRMTR you can’t repeat yourself. I remember Kevin Shields saying of Evil Heat: ‘You can tell you’ve all had children. It’s a bit softer, more loving.’ Actually it is quite a dark record, but he had a point.”

     

    Primal Scream have remained fans of music — still listening, still getting excited — and it shows. When The Light Gets In, which features vocals by the LA singer Sky Ferreira, came from Gillespie hearing her track Everything Is Embarrassing. “I couldn’t get enough of it, so I researched her and realised there was something a bit damaged about her, which I found attractive and interesting. When you’ve been doing it as long as us you want to collaborate with other people to make it different. We had already written Where The Light Gets In and it just worked out.”

     

    Over a career that is coming up for 35 years, Primal Scream have taken a lot of risks, brought in (and said goodbye to) a lot of people, and let things happen without worrying too much about it. They have become a part of Britain’s musical heritage. And they have released one classic hit after another along the way. 

     

    “We’re always writing, working and recording,” Gillespie concludes. “And at the back of our minds, we’re always thinking about that blockbuster hit which will change people’s lives. What else can you hope for?”

  • https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/202010/Marvelous_3_Hey_Album_2959561.jpg
    Hey! Album
    Marvelous 3
    QUICK VIEW
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    Hey! Album Marvelous 3
    Want us to release this album? Then vote now!
    Place your vote by entering your email address below. If this title receives enough votes, we will press it and let you know when it becomes availble to order.
    Thanks for voting
    Hey! Album
    Album Details
    • If voted to win, this would be the first worldwide release on vinyl   
    • Would feature the alternate and rarer “indie” edition artwork and track list   
    • Would be pressed on 140g colored vinyl and come in deluxe packaging
    • Would be limited and individually numbered

     

    Biography

    Marvelous 3 is an American rock band from Atlanta, Georgia. They are best known for their 1998 song "Freak of the Week." Marvelous 3 was formed by lead singer/guitarist Butch Walkerbass guitarist Jayce Fincher, and drummer Doug Mitchell (a.k.a. Mitch "Slug" McLee.) All three band members had played together previously in glam outfit SouthGang, Floyds Funk Revival and The Floyds, before reemerging as Marvelous 3 in 1997 when they released their first album, Math and Other Problems. The band's most successful album – Hey! Album – was released in fall 1998 with the lead single "Freak of the Week" reaching No. 5 on Billboard's Modern Rock Tracks chart and No. 23 on the Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. The band toured with bands such as Collective SoulSR-71Dynamite Hack and Train and appeared on the WB television show Charmed. The band acrimoniously separated from label Elektra Records in spring 2001. Following a final tour, in which the band headlined the Atlanta Music Midtown festival in May 2001, they ended with a final farewell show at Atlanta's Centennial Olympic Park in August 2001.Butch Walker went on to become a successful solo artist, songwriter and record producer, creating hit records for Avril LavigneBowling for SoupPinkFall out BoyLit and SR-71.Marvelous 3 reunited with an advertised appearance at The Autumn Leaves benefit show on November 4, 2018 and performed a 6-song set at the end of Butch Walker's solo headlining set, after having only played together at a handful of Butch's Atlanta solo shows since 2001.

  • https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/202010/Faith_And_Courage_2959553.jpg
    Faith And Courage
    Sinéad O'Connor
    QUICK VIEW
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    Faith And Courage Sinéad O'Connor
    Want us to release this album? Then vote now!
    Place your vote by entering your email address below. If this title receives enough votes, we will press it and let you know when it becomes availble to order.
    Thanks for voting
    Faith And Courage
    Album Details
    • If voted to win, this would be the first worldwide release on vinyl     
    • Would be pressed on 2-140g colored records and come in deluxe packaging with a non-LP bonus track
    • Would be limited and individually numbered

     

    Biography

    Sinéad O'Connor is an Irish singer-songwriter who rose to fame in the late 1980s with her debut album The Lion and the Cobra. O'Connor achieved worldwide success in 1990 with a new arrangement of Prince's song "Nothing Compares 2 U." O'Connor was born in Glenageary in County Dublin and was named after Sinéad de Valera, wife of Irish President Éamon de Valera and mother of the doctor presiding over the delivery, and Saint Bernadette of Lourdes. In 1979 O'Connor left her mother and went to live with her father and his new wife. At the age of 15, her shoplifting and truancy led to her being placed for eighteen months in a Magdalene Asylum, the Grianán Training Centre run by the Order of Our Lady of Charity. In some ways, she thrived there, especially in the development of her writing and music, but she also chafed under the imposed conformity. One of the volunteers at Grianán was the sister of Paul Byrne, drummer for the band In Tua Nua, who heard O'Connor singing "Evergreen" by Barbra Streisand. She recorded a song with them called "Take My Hand" but they felt that at 15, she was too young to join the band. Through an ad she placed in Hot Press in mid-1984, she met Colm Farrelly. Together they recruited a few other members and formed a band called Ton Ton Macoute. The band moved to Waterford briefly while O'Connor attended Newtown School, but she soon dropped out of school and followed them to Dublin, where their performances received positive reviews. Their sound was inspired by Farrelly's interest in world music, though most observers thought O'Connor's singing and stage presence were the band's strongest features. O'Connor's time as singer for Ton Ton Macoute brought her to the attention of the music industry, and she was eventually signed by Ensign Records. She also acquired an experienced manager, Fachtna O'Ceallaigh, former head of U2's Mother Records. Soon after she was signed, she embarked on her first major assignment, providing the vocals for the song "Heroine", which she co-wrote with U2's guitarist The Edge for the soundtrack to the film Captive. Her first album The Lion and the Cobra was "a sensation" when it was released in 1987 and it reached gold record status and earned a Best Female Rock Vocal Performance Grammy nomination. The single "Mandinka" was a big college radio hit in the United States, and "I Want Your (Hands on Me)" received both college and urban play in a remixed form that featured rapper MC Lyte. In her first US network television appearance, O'Connor sang "Mandinka" on Late Night with David Letterman in 1988.[14] The single "Troy" was also released as a single in the UK, Ireland, and the Netherlands, where it reached number 5 on the Dutch Top 40 chart. Her second album – 1990's I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got – gained considerable attention and mostly positive reviews: it was rated "second best album of the year" by the NME. She was praised for her voice and her original songs. She was also noted for her appearance: her trademark shaved head, often angry expression, and sometimes shapeless or unusual clothing.The album I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got featured Marco Pirroni and Kevin Mooney, of Adam and the Ants fame, and contained her international breakthrough hit "Nothing Compares 2 U", a song written by Prince and originally recorded and released by a side project of his, The Family.In 1990, she joined many other guests for former Pink Floyd member Roger Watersmassive performance of The Wall in Berlin. (In 1996, she would guest on Broken China, a solo album by Richard Wright of Pink Floyd.) In 1991, her take on Elton John's "Sacrifice" was acclaimed as one of the best efforts on the tribute album Two Rooms: Celebrating the Songs of Elton John & Bernie Taupin. She toured with Lollapalooza in 1995, but dropped out when she became pregnant. In 1994, she appeared in A Celebration: The Music of Pete Townshend and The Who, also known as Daltrey Sings Townshend. This was a two-night concert at Carnegie Hall produced by Roger Daltrey of The Who in celebration of his 50th birthday. A CD and a VHS video of the concert were issued in 1994, followed by a DVD in 1998. Faith and Courage was released in 2000, including the single "No Man's Woman", and featured contributions from Wyclef Jean of the Fugees and Dave Stewart of Eurythmics. If voted to win, ROG would issue Faith And Courage on vinyl for the first time.

New Arrivals

  • https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/202010/Fear%20Factory%20Cover.jpg
    DEMANUFACTURE 25th Anniversary Deluxe Edition
    FEAR FACTORY
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  • https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/202009/H_ROGV_115_3000.jpg
    Live in Philly 2010
    Halestorm
    https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/202009/H_ROGV_115_3000.jpg
  • https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/202009/BNL_Maroon_20th_0.jpg
    “Maroon” 20th Anniversary Edition
    Barenaked Ladies
    https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/202009/BNL_Maroon_20th_0.jpg
  • https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/201911/Dusty%20-%201500.jpg
    Dusty In Memphis Deluxe Edition
    Dusty Springfield
    https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/201911/Dusty%20-%201500.jpg
  • https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/201908/rogv-028_incredible_string_band_front_2.jpg
    The Hangman’s Beautiful Daughter
    The Incredible String Band
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  • https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/201908/rogv-058_better_than_ezra_jacket_front.jpg
    Friction, Baby
    Better Than Ezra
    https://www.runoutgroovevinyl.com/sites/g/files/g2000007381/f/201908/rogv-058_better_than_ezra_jacket_front.jpg
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Now you know what you do as a member of the Run Out Groove collector community, but exactly how do we put these special limited edition releases in your hands?
vote
Each month, we provide a list of titles that could go to press, and you vote for the one you'd most like to have in your collection.
1
pre-order
The title that receives the most votes is available for pre-order for 30 days only.
2
Record is pressed
When the pre-order window closes, we announce how many individually numbered records will be pressed in the one-time run and begin production. It takes 8 to 12 weeks to deliver the finished LP.
3
Delivery
We ship the records to those that pre-ordered and to participating record stores.
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